Housing: how the Left buys votes while abandoning society’s poorest

The Left claims it stands up for the poorest in society, proudly offering benefits for everyone in need.

Everyone in need? That can’t be right. The last census showed 1.8million households on council waiting lists, with 360,000 living in overcrowded conditions. That means children sleeping on sofas, or on the floor, with nowhere to do homework.

But there were 1.6million tenants with spare bedrooms.

You might think the Left would support a policy to sort this out. But you’d be wrong.

Instead, the Left decided the votes of those with spare rooms were more important than the 1.8million worse off.

The Left also thinks that once you’ve got a council tenancy, it’s yours for life, even if one day in the future you no longer need it because you get promoted at work, or start your own business.

That means people like former MP and cabinet minister Frank Dobson, who earned £100,000 a year but carried on living in his council flat, and union boss Bob Crow, who earned £145,000 but saw no ‘moral duty’ to move out of his taxpayer-subsidised home for anyone more deserving.

A few years ago there were 60,000 council tenants who owned a property but chose to live in council housing instead, about half that number earning over £60,000, and with 6,000 more than £100,000.

These are well-paid teachers, NHS managers, union officials and council staff. They can afford more than the 40% or less of market rents they pay to their council, or live further away from their work. They are not going to end up on the streets.

You might think the Left would support a policy to sort this out, given the housing crisis they keep accusing the Government of failing to fix. But you’d be wrong.

Instead, they decided the votes of the property owners and high earners were more important than the 1.8million worse off.

And now they’ve forced the Government to drop the plans. Well done to the Left, the champions of the poorest in society.

 

 

 

 

 

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